Why are Indian celebrities turning to surrogacy?

Archive of the courses at the Chair of Philosophy / Aesthetic Theory

All happy families. Family happiness and failure in the film

Seminar (Free Art FK-T2 and FK-T4 as well as Art Education E.02.09)

Prof. Dr. Marina Martinez Mateo

Time: Tuesday, 4:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m., bi-weekly, starting on October 20th.

Room: E.O1.23

"All happy families are alike - each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way." With this famous sentence Leo Tolstoy leaves his Ana Karenina start. All happy families are alike - why? Because the "happy family" is a promise, an image, or an ideal. In pictures of laughing children and caring mothers, of Sunday outings and game evenings, the family institution formulates a promise of happiness that acts as an orientation guide for many real (especially white and middle-class) families. At the same time there are - probably since the historical beginning of the bourgeois nuclear family - also pictures and stories that tell of the failure to achieve this promised happiness; of the various "individual" types of misfortune that the orientation towards the ideal of the family produces. It is precisely these different ways of failure and the forms of violence and insecurity with which they can be associated that are a rich source of aesthetic arguments with the family. In this duplication of images, the film plays a central role. After all, the film is also a preferred medium for establishing the promise and ideal of the family as it - on this basis - also has a special subversive potential to express the breaks and structural crises that lie in this promise in their peculiarity and diversity bring to.

In the seminar we will deal with the double structure - promises of happiness and crisis-prone families - and will be based on two pillars: on the one hand we will watch selected films on this topic and on the other hand we will deal with theoretical approaches to determination and criticism read with the family, which should also provide us with a basis from which to discuss the films together.

 

Subversive life forms

Seminar (Free Art FK-T2 and FK-T4 as well as Art Education E.02.09

Prof. Dr. Marina Martinez Mateo

Time: Tuesday, 4:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m., bi-weekly, starting on October 27th.

Room: E.O1.23

What are subversive life forms? What can the concern to live subversively mean? “Subversion” means the idea of ​​a critical policy aimed at transformation, which does not operate in declared political institutions or in organized collectives, but rather functions in an infiltrating way - on a small or hidden scale. Living subversively means that such an infiltration can also happen in everyday life, in each individual life, and may even have its privileged place therein. This understanding of politics is significant in feminist theory and practice, for example, or in certain anarchist approaches and in the politics of the “„ 68s ”. Slogans such as “The private is political” or “Politics of the first person” testify to such a perspective that places politics in life and in the transformation of the own Life even sees the basis for social and revolutionary upheavals. Depending on the approach, the politicization of one's own life can mean completely different things: from the formation of new and solidary "modes of relationship" (as Bini Adamczak suggests), to the refusal of activity (as the classic figure of "Bartleby" was interpreted) and withdrawal from society (as Henry-David Thoreau tried) to practiced anti-fascism (which Natasha Lennard calls for in her current "Essays on Non-Fascist Life"), feminist everyday practice (as Sara Ahmed in "Living a Feminist Life") and the transformation of one's own body (as described by Paul Preciado in his recently published “Chronicles of Transition”).

In the seminar we want to face the differences and also the internal tension of these approaches and discuss the respective understanding of politics as well as of life and its design. How individualistic, how utopian, how interventionist, how constructive or how negative does politics appear in each case? What happens to the relation to everyday life, to privacy, to relationships or to one's own body when these become political arenas? And what is possibly lost in the process? Which possibilities of emancipation, but also which problems and dangers, can lie in the narrowing of politics and life and what can we take with us from the discussed approaches and proposals?

 

Futurisms: Politics and Aesthetics of the Future

Oberseminar and research colloquium philosophy

Prof. Dr. Marina Martinez Mateo and Anne Gräfe, M.A.

Time: Wednesday 5:00 pm - 9:00 pm, biweekly.

Dates: October 28, November 11, November 25, December 9, January 13, January 27, February 10

Dates for doctoral colloquium: December 9th, February 10th

Room: E.EG.28

What does “future” mean as an aesthetic-political category and what does its use imply? If one looks at different ways of aesthetically and politically referring to "future", it turns out that these can mean very different things. The Italian futurism of the 1910s and 20s called for art to be freed from its nostalgic ties to the past in order to open up to the “future” through the full development of creative energies in “creation and action”. In doing so, they wanted to move from the modernization of art to a politics that was “violent”, “liberal”, “dynamic” and guided by the “beauty” of war and danger - in ever closer proximity to fascism. If so-called “accelerationism” today also promises to bring the future back, there are clear references to the category of the future in historical futurism, even if a different political program is explicitly at the center. The example of “Afrofuturism” in turn brings in the reference to a utopian, but not concretely determinable, future in order to think beyond racist conditions, while on the other hand the - critically intended - category “Reproductive Futurism” (Lee Edelman) illustrates how the future can become its own normative authority (for example in the talk of the “future generations”), which limits the ability to act politically in the present. The “future” category is also linked to the need for improvement, optimization and progress - categories that are clearly defining in the context of “neoliberalism” and meanwhile extend into all areas of society.

“Future” means an opening, the hope for a movement of change in which the present has become the past. The fact that this can both refer to a utopian moment and also function in a repressive and destructive manner will be discussed in the senior seminar. By dealing with the various “futurisms” mentioned here, we try to understand and systematize the various strands, dimensions of meaning and internal ambivalences in relation to the future.

The seminar also includes the Philosophy Research Colloquium. In two of the sessions (December 9th and February 10th) there will be the opportunity to discuss (future) dissertations, theses and research projects. Students and interested parties are cordially invited to present their work. If you are interested, please contact us at: This email address is being protected from spambots! To display JavaScript must be turned on!

 

Basics of art and cultural history / introduction to art history and philosophy

Freie Kunst FK-T1 and KP D.01.09 (compulsory course for students in the 1st semester of fine arts and art education)

Lecturers: Prof. Dr. Marina Martinez Mateo, Prof. Dr. Florian Matzner, Prof. Dr. Dietmar Rübel.

Time: Wednesday, 2:00 pm - 2:45 pm or 3:00 pm - 3:45 pm (weekly), starting on October 21, 2020

Room: E.EG.28 or E.O1.23 or E.EG.29 (depending on registration)

The weekly event aims to impart the basics of scientific work, especially in art history and philosophy. Exemplary examples provide an overview of the history of art as well as the most important methods and subject areas of art history and philosophy. To this end, selected works of art are discussed together with selected texts (primary sources and secondary literature). We also visit the museums and libraries that are important for the history and theory of art. A visit to the library also serves as an introduction to literature research; In addition, relevant internet resources are presented and tips for preparing presentations and term papers are given.

Proof of achievement: regular participation (at least 80% attendance)

 

Singularities and singularization

Seminar (Free Art FK-T2 and FK-T4 as well as Art Education E.02.09)

Anne Gräfe (M.A.)

Time: Thursday, 3 p.m. to 5 p.m., weekly, starting on October 29th.

Room: A.EG.01, E.EG.28 (10.12.)

In his book The society of singularities the cultural sociologist Andreas Reckwitz explains that the process of singularization can be used to explain the cultural, political and social developments of the present. The singularization describes the creation process of the singularities. But what are singularities? Because depending on the theoretical and political perspective, the term singularity actually subsumes extremely diverse ideas: Singularity is sometimes described as a uniform unit of the singular as "single" (Jameson), as procedural (Haraway), as individually unique (Reckwitz), as understood as universal (Badiou), plural (Nancy), non-human force (Deleuze), as well as a technological event which “will radically change human civilization” (Eden, Moor). For Felix Guattari, the process of singularization is also a possible counterforce to standardization and norming in capitalism, since it enables “new social and aesthetic practices, new practices of the self” and thus does not describe the singular as normatively unique, but as diverse and constantly changing.

The different theoretical approaches should be discussed in the seminar to the effect of how singularity addresses a pluralistic "one", how it differs from the idea of ​​the specific and individual, and to what extent the process of singularization is always a (critical?) Reaction to what is assumed to be given and standardized The way of life of the present is to be understood, which can be expressed in diversity in the commandment of equality.

Proof of performance: regular participation (at least 80% attendance), writing a term paper (at least 10 pages)

 

Camp, counter-interpretation and a new aesthetic experience

Seminar (Free Art FK-T2 and FK-T4 as well as Art Education E.02.09)

Anne Grafe (M.A.)

Time: Friday, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., bi-weekly, starting on November 6th, further dates: November 20th. / 4.12. / 18.12. / 8.1. / 22.01. / 5.2.

Room: E.O1.23

“Apart from 'postmodernism' in aesthetic theory, there is probably no term that is so diffuse and at the same time so powerful”, like 'camp', wrote Felix Stephan in der Süddeutsche Zeitung. What 'camp' is is all the more problematic to grasp. In 1964 Susan Sontag defined 'camp' as a way of experiencing, a sensitivity in the way of looking at art and the world from a purely aesthetic point of view. The aesthetic is so exaggerated that the moral and the political seem to disappear behind them. The unresponsive, cool and at the same time supposedly non-identifying is what defines camp on the one hand. On the other hand, camp is related to irony, kitsch and pop culture. “Pure camp is always naive. Camp, which knows that it is camp, is generally less convincing. ”The art that is received as camp is therefore usually meant seriously and is thus received at the same time as camp and non-camp, that is, both as camp and as serious meant to understand art to be identified with it. At Camp, in the form of ironic exaggeration and exaggeration of self-serious stereotypical ideas within society, precisely those stereotypical ideas were presented and exposed as such (even if that may not have been the primary goal of the camp movement). It is interesting that Camp, of whom Susan Sontag herself wrote that it is impossible to describe, is moving from an ironic break with the mass culture of the 1960s and 70s, “consuming culture in quotation marks”, in the present to a retro- Fashion, and thus a mass phenomenon, has meanwhile acted as an appropriation and exaggeration, often without irony, and thus as a product and engine of this mass culture. And last but not least, Sontag saw the experiential space for Camp in experiencing the psychopathologies of abundance. However, these psychopathologies of abundance have intensified and changed since then. Then what can be camp today?

Based on Susan Sontag's essays, with a view to current artistic positions and other theoretical texts, the seminar will examine which updates have been made in art, pop culture and aesthetics since Sontag's essays and how Sontag's considerations could continue to help in times of identity politics and late capitalism, another To take perspective as a new aesthetic experience.

Proof of performance: regular participation (at least 80% attendance), writing a term paper (at least 10 pages).

 

Under different conditions

Block seminar (Free Art FK-T2 and FK-T4 as well as Art Education E.02.09)

Nisaar Ulama, M.A.

Dates: Thu October 29th, 6:00 pm-8:00pm, Fri October 30th, 10:00 am-6:00pm, Sat October 31st, 10:00 am-4:00pm

Room: A.EG.01

Under different conditions the academy would be a place of free exchange and a seminar the space in which nothing is out of the question - including what theory and practice, philosophy and art can actually be. Now this is itself in question, for an uncertain time. Like other places of gathering and collaboration, the academy is confronted with having to set actually impossible conditions in order to be able to guarantee a minimal form of exchange.

But between the longing for normality and exhaustion through improvisation, a state of emergency can also be understood as an opportunity to question very fundamental issues. More than ever, the question arises under what conditions our art and knowledge production actually took place and should take place in the future. What can the sovereignty of an institution like the Academy of Fine Arts, as a guarantor of theoretical and practical freedom, mean? What remains of our complaints when we deduct the self-pity of the privileged? What are the thick walls of the academy supposed to protect against?

These are some questions by which we may not necessarily be able to answer, but possibly too other conditions could arrive. The seminar takes place as a block seminar, and according to Derrida, the following applies: Let us take our time, but do it quickly, because we don't know what to expect.

Reading in preparation:

Rosi Braidotti, How To Do Posthuman Thinking, in this., Posthuman Knowledge, Polity Press 2019

Jacques Derrida, The unconditional university, Suhrkamp 2001

Zoe Todd, An Indigenous Feminist’s Take On The Ontological Turn: ‘Ontology’ Is Just Another Word For Colonialism, in: Journal of Historical Sociology Vol. 29 (1), 2016

 

The fabric of the demonic canvas - image spaces beyond visibility

Teaching assignment

Seminar (Free Art FK-T2 and FK-T4 as well as Art Education E.02.09)

Leo Heinik 

Time: Friday, 10 a.m. - 2 p.m., biweekly, starting on October 23.

Further dates: Dates: October 23, October 30, November 13, November 27, December 11, January 15, January 29.

Room: E.O1.23

The demonic canvas is the title Lotte H. Eisner chose for her book about the development of film production in Germany in the 1920s, published in 1952. Eisner is not a distant observer - the story that she traces up to National Socialism is closely linked to her own biography. She was close friends with many of her protagonists. As an opposition Jewish author, she was forced to flee Germany in 1933 after the Nazis came to power. With the figure of the demonic, she provides access to the contradictions and abysses that are hidden in the warps of the canvas.When doubles and revenants peel themselves out of the chiaroscuro on its surface and plunge back into the expressive backgrounds with excessive, choppy movements, the canvas reveals itself as an obsessed, haunted structure. She arches and struggles under the tensions that pull her, straightens up and folds into a haunted house, in which a resident finds herself who shortly before thought she was just a viewer.

Von Eisner, who refers to Goethe's use of the demonic as an inexorable force of fate, leads the seminar to Jacques Derridas Hantology. As a counter-concept to ontology, the doctrine of beings, this materialistic doctrine of visitation fills the gaps that open up at the transitions between the levels of time and meaning of goods, objects of use and carriers of memory. Wendy Hui Kyong Chun shows that demonic forces are at work even in contemporary technologies. In the form of background processes, they are involved in maintaining interfaces that convey feelings of control and freedom of action to their users. In current films by Nia DaCosta, Mati Diop, Bong Joon-ho and Jordan Peele, obsession and hauntedness are tools with which racist and classical structures become tangible.

In each session, selected texts and films are related to each other and discussed. The seminar thus follows the dynamics of the demonic and the visitation in the hope of ultimately leaving the field of the visible. Because the gaze is sluggish and cannot cope with the visual volatility of the ghosts. Is it possible to get hold of the apparitions? How does a ghost feel, like a projection?

 

Reproduction, circulation, migration. Current Aesthetic Positions

Teaching assignment

Block seminar (Free Art FK-T2 and FK-T4)

David Weber
Dates: 13.01. 2 p.m. - 6 p.m., 14.01. 10 a.m. - 6 p.m., January 15. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Room: A.EG.01 (13.01.), E.EG.28 (14./15.01.)

The block seminar offers a highlight-like mapping of contemporary aesthetic theory following prominent positions in the modern and post-modern era. Terms such as reproduction and reproducibility (Benjamin), the media-specific (Greenberg, Fried, Krauss), the dissemination (Derrida, Barthes) and the simulacrum (Baudrillard, Deleuze) are taken up in order to trace their discourse-historical transfers in theoretical drafts that make an effort capture contemporary phenomena. Among other things, it is about the liquefaction and delimitation of reproduction in the age of digital networks, where aspects of dematerialization (Lucy Lippard) and rematerialization ("Post-Digital", Diana Coole) are interconnected in a peculiar double bind. By the 1970s at the latest (Pictures, Crimp), the glistening depth of reproduced surfaces had already been demonstrated; meanwhile, this is gaining a changed dynamic as circulation in the networks and propagates modifications in the status of the works and authors (Joselit, Steyerl, Price). So is there a New Aesthetic (Bridle, Sterling, Manovich, Galloway) in the context of a post-postmodern, millennial mindset (New Sincerity, Foster Wallace, Tao Lin)? Globalization qua data networks is inseparable from the movements of cultures, goods and people: Phenomena of Afroization mark, among others, the facts of generalized migration: Be it modernist-optimistic: Afro-futurism (Anderson, Delaney, Eshun); skeptical-militant: Afro-pessimism (Sexton, Moten, Wilderson); or post-Ferguson thetic: This is… Afro-Surrealism (T. Francis, D. Glover, T. Nance).

 

Full surrogacy now

Lectureship of the women's representative

Seminar (Free Art FK-T2)

Yanna Thönnes

Dates: Fri November 27th, 2:00 pm-5:00pm, Fri December 4th, 10:00 am-5:00pm, Sat December 5th, 10:00 am-5:00pm

Room: E.O1.23 (27.11.), E.EG.28 (04.12.), A.EG.01 (05.12.)

Please register via the student portal

“Where pregnancy is concerned, let every pregnancy be for everyone. Let us
overthrow, in short, the family. "

Pregnancy is still an unsolved problem.

The seminar “Full Surrogacy Now” will deal with the myth of motherhood by analyzing a counter-figure: the surrogate mother. Based on the reading of “Full Surrogacy Now - Feminism Against Family” by Sophie Lewis, we will shed light on various topics around the phenomenon of surrogacy: Surrogacy (from the Latin surrogare: replace) interests us first as a phenomenon of paid reproductive work, which in neoliberal power imbalances along Gender, class, race and caste are involved.

In examining the mechanisms that create global reproductive inequalities, we will probe the market around the “dream of the genetically related child”: case studies of Indian so-called baby farms and the global pathways of egg cells, sperm, the so-called commissioning parents and surrogate mothers serve as a basis for understanding the economic field. Finally, we focus on the work of the surrogate mothers themselves, which takes place between affect control, emotional management, constant availability and stigma.

In the second part of the seminar, the myth of motherhood will be examined as a theme of recent art history and contemporary positions. Finally, it is important to discuss how surrogacy as a theoretical figure and as a practice can develop its queer potential and turn patriarchal, capitalist constructions of the family upside down - and last but not least, how we as young artists face the question of parenthood personally are.

 

Summer semester 2020

From aesthesis to aesthetics

Prof. Dr. Marina Martinez Mateo (This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots! JavaScript must be enabled to view it!)

lecture (Free Art FK-T2 and FK-T4 as well as Art Education Module E.01.09)

Thursday 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. (weekly), start: 30.04.2020

The event will (initially) take place online.

 

(Room: E.O1.23, E.EG.22 (16.07.))

Registration via the student portal

 

What is aesthetics? This question is not only impossible to answer because “aesthetics” is a contested and meaning-dependent term. It is also historically highly specific and itself - not only in the possible answer, but already in the formulation of the question - the result of a historical one

Development with which the aesthetic became a (philosophical) topic for the first time. While the old understanding of aesthetics (under the term "aesthesis") related more to sensory perception in general, a change can be noted in the 18th century: for the first time, aesthetics was associated with a special form of experience and a special form of expression, which differed from a direct, unreflected, "natural" form of perception and in this became philosophically significant.

How can this upheaval be described and what exactly does it mean? To what extent does the old meaning (in a new form) enter the modern concept of aesthetics and where does the new come from? In order to understand the “modern” concept of aesthetics, it is essential to take a closer look at this break and to understand how (and against what) this concept emerged. It is also crucial to take the political context into account. After all, these conceptual shifts lie in a time of revolutionary upheavals - which is what Jacques Rancière brought to the statement that "the social revolution is a daughter of the aesthetic revolution". The lecture will follow two strategies accordingly: On the one hand, we will look at the central philosophical texts of the time, in which the development of a new concept of aesthetics is not only shown, but is sometimes also explicitly undertaken. On the other hand, we will discuss current (or more current) texts in which this upheaval is reflected and interpreted in its historical significance. At the end of the lecture we will certainly not have answered the question “What is aesthetics?”, But we may have got an impression of what is implied and assumed in this question.

 

Decolonial aesthetics and negritude

Prof. Dr. Marina Martinez Mateo (This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots! JavaScript must be enabled to view it!)

seminar (Free Art FK-T2 and FK-T4 as well as Art Education Module E.02.09)

Tuesday, 4:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. (bi-weekly), Start: April 28th, 2020

The seminar will take place as a combination of a jointly designed blog and online discussion.

 

(Room: E.O1.23, E.EG.22 (14.07.))

Registration via the student portal

 

What is aesthetics, what is considered beautiful or what appears to be worth including in the canon of art history is shaped by a history of colonialism and a present of racist conditions. Not only is the validity of aesthetic categories Eurocentric, but the institution of the museum also played an active role in the establishment of colonialism - as can be seen, for example, in the current discussion about restitution.

This interweaving of aesthetics and colonialism will be the focus of the seminar. On the one hand, we will look at approaches that deal critically with it and question both the common aesthetic categories and established art and exhibition practices from this perspective. On the other hand, we will discuss various artistic, theoretical and political movements that have tried (or are trying) to break through this white Eurocentrism through a new aesthetic and also seek to implement an anti-colonial political practice in it. This includes, for example, the Negritude movement of the 1930s, which saw in its literary and theoretical expression a struggle for political and aesthetic self-determination - for a redefinition of what “to be black” means (Aime Césaire and Léopolod Sédar are particularly well-known here Senghor or Paulette Nardal). The Negritude not only sparked a series of (sometimes extremely critical) discussions (Frantz Fanon and Jean-Paul Sartre should be mentioned here), but also visibly influenced European art of the time. In current approaches to “black radical aesthetics”, these discussions are taken up to a certain extent in order - starting from there and against their pitfalls - to aesthetically interpret the experience of “being black” in order to search for resistant possibilities of expression. This aesthetic expression becomes a political positioning and a means of anti-racist struggles - out of a situation of radical exclusion in which every possibility of political action seems cut off (central approaches here are, for example, those of Fred Morten and Hortense Spiller).

In dealing with these positions and approaches, the seminar will address the question of what a decolonial aesthetic could look like and what role the category “race” would have to play. This means that the connection between aesthetic expression and political transformation is at the center of the discussion. We will orientate ourselves on the three mentioned thematic blocks: 1. Critical perspectives on colonialism and aesthetics; 2. Discussions about Negritude; 3. Black Radical Aesthetics.

 

Hannah Arendt - thinking without a railing

Anne Grafe, M. A. (This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots! JavaScript must be enabled to view it!)

seminar (Free Art FK-T2 and FK-T4 as well as Art Education Module E.02.09)

 

Due to the current situation, the seminar is planned as a home and online seminar. Registration is still possible via the Student portal. The seminar schedule, media, links and all other information are made available via Sync & Share. The link to Sync & Share as well as to the online conference room will be sent via email to all participants registered via the student portal during the first week of the lecture period.

 

 

The excursion to Berlin (see below) remains as planned for the time being and will be postponed depending on developments.

 

When the exit restrictions are lifted and the resulting 'normal' academy operations:

Thursday 3 p.m. - 5 p.m. (weekly); Start: April 30th, 2020; Room: E.EG.22, E.ZG.04 (July 16)

 

Hannah Arendt (1906 - 1975) calls her method of radically independent thinking "thinking without a railing", free of general beliefs, fashionable ways of thinking, established principles, traditional norms and common prejudices, which enables independent, reflected judgments and is able to raise questions. whose topicality also appear unbroken in our present. In view of the political events of her time, Arendt asks, "Does politics still have any meaning?" Because the crises of the world can often not be interpreted with conventional explanatory models, nor, according to Arendt, the event of totalitarianism can be understood as an unbroken continuity. This means that thinking has to be relearned “as if nobody had thought before”. The seminar practices with Arendt "how to think" without "regulations about what should be thought or what truths should be upheld". Arendt's answer to your above question is: “The meaning of politics is freedom”. Because, for Hannah Arendt, political freedom, freedom in general, is indispensably linked to what Kantsensus communis calls, common sense. The common sense establishes an in-between space that must always be kept open, in which one can move freely, think, negotiate and make reflective judgments.

The seminar will discuss the reflective judgment that grows from thinking without a railing, using various texts by Hannah Arendt, including the situation of the refugees, the Eichmann trial, revolutions, feminism, student movements, but also philosophy and politics, and using their own contemporary texts Update questions.

 

Field trip:

From May 27th to 29th There will be an excursion accompanying the seminar to the exhibition "Hannah Arendt and the 20th Century" in the German Historical Museum Berlin.

05/27 3 pm: visit to the exhibition including a tour of the curator + evening event on Hannah Arendt and the student movement; with Monika Boll (curator), Norbert Frei (historian, University of Jena), Philipp Felsch (cultural scientist HU), Mathias Schloßberger (philosopher, Viadrina)

May 28 4-8pm: Joint workshop at the Institute for Cultural Studies at HU together with the “Left-Center-Right” seminar by Mathias Schloßberger, European University Viadrina

May 29th: requested lecture * Discussion on "Hannah Arendt and Populism"

The number of participants is limited, please register in advance at This email address is being protected from spambots! To display JavaScript must be turned on!.

 

 

Society in excessive demand

Anne Grafe, M. A.(This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots! JavaScript must be enabled to view it!)

seminar (Free Art FK-T2 and FK-T4 as well as Art Education Module E.02.09)

Due to the current situation, the seminar will not take place as a face-to-face seminar as planned, but in a different form. The seminar schedule, media, links and all other information are available under Sync & Share. The link to Sync & Share as well as to the online conference room will be sent via email to all participants registered via the student portal in the first week of the lecture.

 

When the exit restrictions are lifted and the resulting 'normal' academy operations:

Friday 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. (biweekly); Start: May 8th, 2020; further dates: June 5th, June 12th, June 19th, July 3rd, July 17th; Room: E.O1.23, E.EG.22 (July 17th)

 

The fatigue, indifference or even boredom that overtakes viewers of contemporary art can be understood as the kind of excessive attentiveness that one suffers when trying to read a dictionary (Sianne Ngai). The seminar will discuss that this excessive demand turns into boredom and that this boredom can in turn develop a critical potential.

The subjects of the present are subject to a constant process of updating, which is not least reflected in the works of contemporary art. If in the past the subject was still determined by others and disciplined by an external "outside", the subject of the present has often enough already adapted to these requirements and discipline and control take place from the "inside" (Michel Foucault): Die Entbegrenzten Arbeitsrechte, in who require flexibility, constant availability and self-control, where work is no longer from 9 to 5 but on a project basis, time recording is converted into trust-based working time and the workplace is converted into home office, so continue to have an effect on the subject of the present by continuing to do so Discipline “from the outside”.But beyond that, a self-discipline takes place within certain work areas through adaptation, autonomization and flexibilization, which is equivalent to the incorporation of the above-mentioned unbounding invocations. In the performance society, the subjects of the present increase their own productivity as "Homo oeconomicus" (Ulrich Bröckling). Work becomes a life project in which working time and lifetime not only overlap but become one. So supposedly private moments are still used as optimization time in the form of meaningful fulfillment and utilization of the lifetime. The free, empty time must be filled with meaning.

If, however, despite all efforts to overcome boredom, the supposedly interesting and informative is not filled with meaning but rather indifference and laziness because the excessive demands are too great, it shows how close the interesting and the boring lie to each other.

Which practices and positions in contemporary art implement this depressive hedonism (Marc Fisher) as the new Buddhist spirit of capitalism (Greta Wagner) will be discussed in the seminar alongside various contemporary analyzes from philosophy and social science.

 

Cybernetics and Revolt

seminar (Free Art FK-T2 and FK-T4 as well as Art Education Module E.02.09)

Nisaar Ulama, M.A. (This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots! JavaScript must be enabled to view it!)

The seminar will be postponed to the end of the semester. Preparatory texts will be provided at the beginning of the semester. Registration via the student portal (limited number of participants).

 

The seminar is titled after a text by the anonymous author collective Tiqqun. A “cybernetic hypothesis” is being negotiated there, namely the conviction that has been prevalent since the Second World War at the latest that our “biological, physical and social behaviors are to be viewed as fully programmed and reprogrammable”.

Tiqqun join a theoretical tradition for which political, technical, aesthetic and economic developments of the modern age can only be analyzed as interrelated phenomena. Such theories, some of which have become historical classics and prominent key words in cultural criticism, will be the focus of the seminar. These include Jean-François Lyotard's ideas of a 'postmodern' knowledge society; Paul Virilio's dromology, according to which we are caught in a 'frenzied standstill'; or Jean Baudrillard's thesis of a society of simulacras in which art and politics are dead, since "reality itself [...] has merged with its own image". These criticisms are currently being continued by thinkers like Shoshanna Zuboff or Luciana Parisi, who analyze algorithmic decision-making processes and the totality of digital surveillance capitalism.

But there are also voices who insist on the emancipatory potential of the technical. Have we not been waiting too long for a liberated human nature somewhere beyond technocapitalism? In its xenofeminist manifesto, the Laboria Cuboniks collective therefore calls for a "politics of alienation" to enable other realities: "If nature is unjust, change nature!"

All of the texts mentioned here revolve around the question of social change in the face of a powerlessness of the political, and in this respect the title of Tiqqun marks a paradox: Does the power of a closed cybernetic system even allow something like revolt? Doesn't every outside become an inside through all information and image channels? In other words, is all the rhetoric of subversion and resistance always factored in and therefore worthless?

 

Aesthetics of madness. Perspectives on Art and Psychiatry

Block seminar (Free Art FK-T2 and FK-T4 as well as Art Education Module E.02.09)

Prof. Dr. Marina Martinez Mateo (This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots! JavaScript must be enabled to view it!)

Dates: May 6th 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m., June 5th. 10.00 a.m. - 6.00 p.m., 06.06. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

The seminar may be postponed. More information will be made available in good time.

 

Room: E.O2.29 (06.05.), E.EG.28 (05.06., 06.06.)

Registration via the student portal

 

The connection between aesthetics and madness is complex and ambivalent. The ideal of genius postulates its closeness to madness, while the ascription as "mentally ill" at the same time includes an exclusion - and therein also an agreement of aesthetic value - (as the talk of "patient art" suggests). If genius and madness are close together, who is considered to be ingenious and who is considered to be mad? A number of historical examples can be used to discuss that this division does not happen randomly and also not independently of gender ascriptions. This shows an ambivalent relationship - not only in the relationship between aesthetics and delusion, but also in the relationship between art and psychiatry. On the one hand, there is an idealization of madness as a “true” expression of deep and unaltered inwardness, which is also linked to the modern concept of aesthetics. On the other hand, this very notion - as Foucault clearly shows in Wahnsinn und Gesellschaft - historically forms the basis for the development of psychiatry and the establishment of a repressive social exclusion of insanity. On the one hand, there is a fascination for insanity in modern art, such as surrealism, on the other hand, there are visual methods such as photography for the invention of hysteria (Georges Didi-Huberman) and other mental illnesses and their scientification been central. How can this interplay be understood? We want to pursue different strands in the seminar in order to shed light on the relationship between aesthetics and delusion or art and psychiatry. In addition to the texts mentioned, we will read Antonin Artaud, Friedrich Nietzsche, Luce Irigaray and Hubert Fichte and also look at examples of individual artists who incorporate the experience of psychiatry into their work.

The seminar is organized in cooperation with the psychologist Prof. Dr. Sören Krach (Lübeck) and the psychiatrist and art historian Dr. Maurice Cabanis (Stuttgart). It should consist of two blocks: First, there will be a block at the academy where we will approach the topic through text discussions. The second block will be an excursion during which we will visit the “Prinzhorn Collection” in Heidelberg, which is the world's largest collection of artistic works by people with “exceptional psychological experiences”. Here the exhibited works will be discussed against the background of the question of the seminar, and the form and framing of the exhibition itself will be made the topic.

 

Reproduction, circulation, migration. Current Aesthetic Positions

Teaching assignment

Block seminar (Free Art FK-T2 and FK-T4)

David Weber (This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots! JavaScript must be enabled to view it!)

Dates: May 14th 2 p.m. - 6 p.m., May 15. 10 a.m. - 6 p.m., May 16. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

The seminar may take place online. More information will be made available in good time.

Room: E.O2.29

Registration via the student portal

 

The block seminar offers a highlight-like mapping of contemporary aesthetic theory following prominent positions in the modern and post-modern era. Terms such as reproduction and reproducibility (Benjamin), the media-specific (Greenberg, Fried, Krauss), the dissemination (Derrida, Barthes) and the simulacrum (Baudrillard, Deleuze) are taken up in order to trace their discourse-historical transfers in theoretical drafts that make an effort capture contemporary phenomena. Among other things, it is about the liquefaction and delimitation of reproduction in the age of digital networks, where aspects of dematerialization (Lucy Lippard) and rematerialization ("Post-Digital", Diana Coole) are interconnected in a peculiar double bind. By the 1970s at the latest (Pictures, Crimp), the glistening depth of reproduced surfaces had already been demonstrated; meanwhile, this is gaining a changed dynamic as circulation in the networks and propagates modifications in the status of the works and authors (Joselit, Steyerl, Price). So is there a New Aesthetic (Bridle, Sterling, Manovich, Galloway) in the context of a post-postmodern, millennial mindset (New Sincerity, Foster Wallace, Tao Lin)? Globalization qua data networks is inseparable from the movements of cultures, goods and people: Phenomena of Afroization mark, among others, the facts of generalized migration: Be it modernist-optimistic: Afro-futurism (Anderson, Delaney, Eshun); skeptical-militant: Afro-pessimism (Sexton, Moten, Wilderson); or post-Ferguson thetic: This is… Afro-Surrealism (T. Francis, D. Glover, T. Nance).

 

(Un) Writing gender / Writing and gender

Teaching assignment

Block seminar (Free Art FK-T2 and FK-T4, Art Education E.02.09)

Dr. of Hanna's son (This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots! JavaScript must be enabled to view it!)

 

The seminar will likely be postponed to June. Further information follows!

Registration via the student portal

 

Gender is not, at least never exclusively, a purely natural category. Gender is what is produced in innumerable texts, narratives and imaginations. The determination of the masculine in relation to what Freud called the "riddle of femininity" posed at all times is the subject of a long-term purely masculine discourse. Femininity is primarily the “castration” of the male and cannot be separated from a determination of male identity. The shaking of these relationships by feminist criticism not only shakes the understanding of what femininity 'is', but also has fundamental consequences for the relationship and (self) understanding of the sexes.

The demand to strengthen female artists is a central component of current debates and also fundamentally calls into question the institutional structures and processes of the art world. The potential of this demand is not just a mere shift in the balance of power, which is certainly difficult enough. Something else could and should be questioned more intensely here, and yet it is noticeably little reflected in the current debate: What is the relationship between one's own artistry, and especially writing, to gender / physical experiences? How does writing relate to the centuries-old imaginations of the sexes?

The seminar would like to pursue these and related questions by reading various theoretical and literary texts (in particular by Ovid, Sigmund Freud, Simone de Beauvoir, Luce Irigaray, Silvia Bovenschen, Klaus Theweleit, Judith Butler, Chris Kraus, Virginie Despentes, Sheila Heti ). In addition, if you are interested, your own art production and, above all, your own writing practice could also be taken into account for this joint discussion.

The seminar sees itself as a joint discussion and as an introduction to reflecting on gender theory and gender relations in their relationship to artistic / literary production and does not require any previous theoretical knowledge.

 

Futurisms: Politics and Aesthetics of the Future

Research Colloquium Philosophy

Prof. Dr. Marina Martinez Mateo and Anne Gräfe, M.A.

Wednesday 5:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m., Start: April 29th, 2020

Dates: May 6th; May 20; 03.06 .; 06/17; 01.07 .; 07/15

The colloquium will (initially) take place online.

 

(Room: E.ZG.04 (22.04.), E.O2.29 (29.04., 13.05., 17.06.), E.EG.22 (27.05.), E.O1.23 (24.06., 08.07.) ))

 

What kind of aesthetic-political category is “future”? What does it mean and what does it imply to refer to the future? Obviously, “future” can not only mean very different things, it can also be an effective category in very different ways.

The Italian futurism of the 1910s and 20s calls for art to be freed from its nostalgic ties to the past in order to open up to the “future” through the full development of creative energies in “creation and deed”, in which a clear - and in theirs The course was becoming more and more explicit - there was a closeness to fascism. The aim was to move from a modernization of art to a policy that was “violent”, “liberal”, “dynamic” and guided by the “beauty” of war and danger. If so-called “accelerationism” today also promises to bring the future back, this explicitly means another political program that sees itself as anti-capitalist and emancipatory. Nevertheless, there are clear references to historical futurism, which are particularly evident in the “future” category. The example of “Afrofuturism” shows that the fictitious reference to a utopian, but not concretely determinable, future also opens up the possibility of thinking beyond bad - racist - conditions. Such a future enables an anti-racist policy in which the categories and identities against which one opposes are not codified. On the other hand, the - critically intended - category “Reproductive Futurism” (Lee Edelman) illustrates how the future can become an unquestionable normative instance (for example in the talk of the “future generations”) through which any political capacity to act in the Present is limited. From here the question immediately arises to what extent this can also be said about the reference to the future in the “Fridays for Future movement”. In addition, the “future” category is always linked to the strategic claim of improvement, optimization, progress - categories which, for their part, were strongly neoliberal and meanwhile extend into all areas of society.

"Future" means an opening, an indeterminacy, the hope for a movement of change in which the present has become the past. The fact that this can happen in completely different ways and can both refer to a utopian moment and also function in a repressive and destructive manner will be discussed in the senior seminar. By dealing with the various “futurisms” mentioned here, we try to understand and systematize the various strands, dimensions of meaning and internal ambivalences in relation to the future. Two of the sessions (May 13th and June 17th) function as doctoral colloquium in which future dissertations, theses and research projects are discussed.

 

Research colloquium (for master's degree, doctoral and post-doctoral students)

Prof. Dr. Marina Martinez Mateo; Anne Grafe, M.A.

Wednesday, 5:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.; Dates: May 13, 2020, June 17, 2020

The colloquium will probably take place as a block event in the summer. More information will be made available in good time.

The research colloquium offers the opportunity to present and discuss ongoing philosophical, aesthetic or art theoretical qualification work.

Participation after prior registration at: This email address is being protected from spambots! To display JavaScript must be turned on!

 

 

Full surrogacy now

Lectureship of the women's representative

YanaThönnes (This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots! JavaScript must be enabled to view it!)

The seminar will be postponed to the winter semester 2020/21.

 

 

 

Nisaar Ulama, M.A. (This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots! JavaScript must be enabled to view it!)

With Dr. Anna Fricke (Museum Folkwang Essen) and Lena Sophie Trüper, M.A. (DFG graduate college "Knowledge of the Arts", UdK Berlin)

Not applicable