How do I migrate to Iceland

Moving to Iceland - Checklist for Emigration

In Iceland, an average of three people live in one square kilometer - that sounds tempting for many Germans who want to turn their backs on their home country. Iceland is a country for emigrants who love solitude and nature and want to live and work in one of the most peaceful countries in the world. Moving auction has collected everything you need to know that emigrants should consider in their plans, moving and living in Iceland.

Table of Contents
  1. Entry requirements for German emigrants
  2. Working in Iceland: low unemployment and high salaries
  3. Living in Iceland: owning a home instead of renting
  4. Requirements for the move
  5. Customs regulations in Iceland
  6. Moving to Iceland with a forwarding agency

1. Entry requirements for German emigrants

Iceland belongs to Europe, but not to the European Union. Nevertheless, Germans can travel to Iceland quite easily. All you need to start with is your passport or identity card. A long-term work and residence permit is granted to anyone who can prove that they can support themselves through work, savings or a pension. As soon as they work in Iceland, Germans have no restrictions. You will receive a two-year visa, which you can then extend for further years without any problems.

2. Working in Iceland: low unemployment and high salaries

The economy in the small country is strong. The strongest economic sectors are the service sector and the health sector, followed by the IT sector, fishing and tourism. The capital of Iceland, Reykjavik, is the country's cultural center. Many Germans live and work here. It is relatively easy for Germans to find a job in Iceland, but knowledge of English is a necessary prerequisite for finding a job. If you speak Icelandic, you will find a new job even faster. Since unemployment is below two percent, hardly anyone has to wait long for a job to be offered. Compared to Germany, the per capita income is very high, Iceland is in 5th place in the world ranking. As a German, you have to pay tax on your income from work after six months. The health system is state-owned and free for employees.

3. Living in Iceland: owning a home instead of renting

Those who live in Iceland enjoy a good standard of living not only because of high salaries and low living costs: they do not have to pay energy bills and the health system is free. Food prices are cheap, only beer and other alcohol are expensive. However, mobility on the island is somewhat limited. There are no train connections and the only international airport is in the capital, Reykjavík. Anyone living in Iceland therefore needs a car. The interior of the country is almost uninhabited and there is little public transport that runs between the individual places. Most Icelanders live in their own home, so rental accommodation is rare. Those who want to live in Iceland for the long term are probably better off with their own property. If you go to Iceland as a student, you will receive accommodation in a dormitory or guest house.

4. Requirements for the move

You must register your move with the competent Icelandic registration authority or at the office of the District Commissioner of the municipality you want to move to. After your arrival, fill out the registration report. If you change your place of residence, you must report this within seven days. The lawful place of residence for married couples must be registered in the same place. With the registered place of residence you will receive a personal identification number. You will need this to use public services, among other things.

5. Customs regulations in Iceland

If you plan to enter Iceland, you should be aware of the customs and import restrictions that exist on food, alcohol, animals and plants. Clothing, bed linen, camping equipment and other goods for personal use are duty-free. To import your car, you need to show your international driver's license, vehicle registration document and an international insurance policy. A green insurance card is compulsory, without this card you will need to take out liability insurance on arrival.

6. Move to Iceland with a forwarding agency

Before hiring a freight forwarder, compare prices and find the best deal. The company should also convince you professionally. A door-to-door service is best - the shipping company brings the moving container to your front door, so you don't have to take care of the container pick-up yourself. If you can do without some bulky items, take advantage of the extra cargo. Your household items are packed in an already loaded container - that saves money. Be sure to make a list of all the items that you want to take with you, because customs control everything carefully.