What is a rimmed rifle cartridge

7.62 × 51 mm NATO:

The 7.62 × 51 mm NATO is a rimless bottleneck rifle cartridge that was developed as the standard for small arms among NATO countries in the 1950s. It is sometimes confused with the Russian cartridge of the same name, 7.62 × 54 mmR, a slightly longer cartridge with a rim.

7.62 × 51 mm NATO:

The 7.62 × 51 mm NATO is a rimless bottleneck rifle cartridge that was developed as the standard for small arms among NATO countries in the 1950s. It is sometimes confused with the Russian cartridge of the same name, 7.62 × 54 mmR, a slightly longer cartridge with a rim.

7.62 × 51 mm NATO:

The 7.62 × 51 mm NATO is a rimless bottleneck rifle cartridge that was developed as the standard for small arms among NATO countries in the 1950s. It is sometimes confused with the Russian cartridge of the same name, 7.62 × 54 mmR, a slightly longer cartridge with a rim.

7.62 × 51 mm NATO:

The 7.62 × 51 mm NATO is a rimless bottleneck rifle cartridge developed as the standard for small arms among NATO countries in the 1950s. It is sometimes confused with the Russian cartridge of the same name, 7.62 × 54 mmR, a slightly longer cartridge with a rim.

30-30 Winchester:

The .30-30 Winchester / .30 Winchester Center Fire Cartridge was first marketed in 1895 for the Winchester Model 1894 lever rifle. The .30-30 ( thirty-thirty ), as it is most commonly called, and the 25-35 launched this year as the US's first small-barreled sport rifle cartridges for smokeless powder.

7.62 × 53mmR:

The 7.62 × 53 mm row - Rifle cartridge is a Finnish design based on the Russian 7.62 × 54 mm R -Cartridge from 1891 based.

7.62 × 54mmR:

The 7.62 × 54 mm rows is a rifle cartridge with rim developed by the Russian Empire and introduced as a service cartridge in 1891. Originally designed for the Mosin-Nagant bolt action rifle, it was used during the late Tsarist era and throughout the Soviet era to the present day. The cartridge is still one of the few standard rimmed cartridges still in military use and has one of the longest lifespans of any cartridge issued by the military.

7.62 × 54mmR:

The 7.62 × 54 mm rows is a rifle cartridge with rim developed by the Russian Empire and introduced as a service cartridge in 1891. Originally designed for the Mosin-Nagant bolt action rifle, it was used during the late Tsarist era and throughout the Soviet era to the present day. The cartridge is still one of the few standard rimmed cartridges still in military use and has one of the longest lifespans of any cartridge issued by the military.

7.62 × 54mmR:

The 7.62 × 54 mm rows is a rifle cartridge with rim developed by the Russian Empire and introduced as a service cartridge in 1891. Originally designed for the Mosin-Nagant bolt action rifle, it was used during the late Tsarist era and throughout the Soviet era to the present day. The cartridge is still one of the few standard rimmed cartridges still in military use and has one of the longest lifespans of any cartridge issued by the military.

7.62 × 54mmR:

The 7.62 × 54 mm rows is a rifle cartridge with rim developed by the Russian Empire and introduced as a service cartridge in 1891. Originally designed for the Mosin-Nagant bolt action rifle, it was used during the late Tsarist era and throughout the Soviet era to the present day. The cartridge is still one of the few standard rimmed cartridges still in military use and has one of the longest lifespans of any cartridge issued by the military.

7.62 × 54mmR:

The 7.62 × 54 mm rows is a rifle cartridge with rim developed by the Russian Empire and introduced as a service cartridge in 1891. Originally designed for the Mosin-Nagant bolt action rifle, it was used during the late Tsarist era and throughout the Soviet era to the present day. The cartridge is still one of the few standard rimmed cartridges still in military use and has one of the longest lifespans of any cartridge issued by the military.

7.62 × 54mmR:

The 7.62 × 54 mm rows is a rifle cartridge with rim developed by the Russian Empire and introduced as a service cartridge in 1891. Originally designed for the Mosin-Nagant bolt action rifle, it was used during the late Tsarist era and throughout the Soviet era to the present day. The cartridge is still one of the few standard rimmed cartridges still in military use and has one of the longest lifespans of any cartridge issued by the military.

7.62 × 54mmR:

The 7.62 × 54 mm rows is a rifle cartridge with rim developed by the Russian Empire and introduced as a service cartridge in 1891. Originally designed for the Mosin-Nagant bolt action rifle, it was used during the late Tsarist era and throughout the Soviet era to the present day. The cartridge is still one of the few standard rimmed cartridges still in military use and has one of the longest lifespans of any cartridge issued by the military.

7.62 × 54mmR:

The 7.62 × 54 mm rows is a rifle cartridge with rim developed by the Russian Empire and introduced as a service cartridge in 1891. Originally designed for the Mosin-Nagant bolt action rifle, it was used during the late Tsarist era and throughout the Soviet era to the present day. The cartridge is still one of the few standard rimmed cartridges still in military use and has one of the longest lifespans of any cartridge issued by the military.

7.62 × 54mmR:

The 7.62 × 54 mm rows is a rifle cartridge with rim developed by the Russian Empire and introduced as a service cartridge in 1891. Originally designed for the Mosin-Nagant bolt action rifle, it was used during the late Tsarist era and throughout the Soviet era to the present day. The cartridge is still one of the few standard rimmed cartridges still in military use and has one of the longest lifespans of any cartridge issued by the military.

7.62 × 54mmR:

The 7.62 × 54 mm rows is a rifle cartridge with rim developed by the Russian Empire and introduced as a service cartridge in 1891. Originally designed for the Mosin-Nagant bolt action rifle, it was used during the late Tsarist era and throughout the Soviet era to the present day. The cartridge is still one of the few standard rimmed cartridges still in military use and has one of the longest lifespans of any cartridge issued by the military.

30-40 cantilever:

The .30-40 cantilever was a cartridge developed in the early 1890s to provide the U.S. armed forces with a smoke-free powder cartridge suitable for use with modern small-bore bolt-action rifles selected in the small-arm trials of 1892. Since the cartridge that was replaced was the Government .45-70, the cartridge was considered a .45-70 at the time small . The design chosen was ultimately the Krag-Jørgensen, which was officially adopted as the M1892 Springfield. It was also used in M1893 and later Gatling guns.

30-40 cantilever:

The .30-40 cantilever was a cartridge developed in the early 1890s to provide the U.S. armed forces with a smoke-free powder cartridge suitable for use with modern small-bore bolt-action rifles selected in the small-arm trials of 1892. Since the cartridge that was replaced was the Government .45-70, the cartridge was considered a .45-70 at the time small . The design chosen was ultimately the Krag-Jørgensen, which was officially adopted as the M1892 Springfield. It was also used in M1893 and later Gatling guns.

.30-06 Springfield:

The .30-06 Springfield- Cartridge, 7.62 × 63 mm in metric notation and called ".30 Gov't '06" by Winchester, was introduced to the US Army in 1906 and later standardized. it remained in use until the late 1970s. The ".30" refers to the caliber of the bullet in inches. The "06" refers to the year the cartridge was introduced in 1906. It replaced the .30-03, 6 mm Lee Navy and .30-40 Krag cartridges. The .30-06 remained the main rifle and machine gun cartridge in the U.S. Army for nearly 50 years before being replaced by the 7.62 × 51mm NATO and the 5.56 × 45mm NATO, both in the current U.S. and NATO service remain. It remains a very popular sports round with ammunition from all major manufacturers.

.30-06 Springfield:

The .30-06 Springfield- Cartridge, 7.62 × 63 mm in metric notation and called ".30 Gov't '06" by Winchester, was introduced in the US Army in 1906 and later standardized. it remained in use until the late 1970s. The ".30" refers to the caliber of the bullet in inches. The "06" refers to the year the cartridge was introduced in 1906. It replaced the .30-03, 6 mm Lee Navy and .30-40 Krag cartridges. The .30-06 remained the main rifle and machine gun cartridge in the U.S. Army for nearly 50 years before being replaced by the 7.62 × 51mm NATO and the 5.56 × 45mm NATO, both in the current U.S. and NATO service remain. It remains a very popular sports round with ammunition from all major manufacturers.

.30-06 Springfield:

The .30-06 Springfield- Cartridge, 7.62 × 63 mm in metric notation and called ".30 Gov't '06" by Winchester, was introduced to the US Army in 1906 and later standardized. it remained in use until the late 1970s. The ".30" refers to the caliber of the bullet in inches. The "06" refers to the year the cartridge was introduced in 1906. It replaced the .30-03, 6 mm Lee Navy and .30-40 Krag cartridges. The .30-06 remained the main rifle and machine gun cartridge in the U.S. Army for nearly 50 years before being replaced by the 7.62 × 51mm NATO and the 5.56 × 45mm NATO, both in the current U.S. and NATO service remain. It remains a very popular sports round with ammunition from all major manufacturers.

.30-03:

The .30-03 Springfield (7.62 × 65mm) was a short-lived cartridge developed by the US in 1903 to replace the .30-40 Krag in the new Springfield 1903 rifle. The .30-03 was also known as the .30-45 because it used a powder charge of 45 grains; The name was changed to .30-03 to indicate the year of adoption. A 220-grit round nose ball was used. It was replaced by the .30-06 after only three years of operation and fired a Spitzer bullet that achieved better ballistic performance.

.300 Winchester Magnum:

The .300 Winchester Magnum (7.62 × 67mmB) is a belted and bottleneck magnum rifle cartridge introduced by the Winchester Repeating Arms Company in 1963. The .300 Winchester Magnum is a magnum cartridge designed for standard rifle movement. It is based on the .375 H&H Magnum, which was blown out, shortened and reduced in size to accommodate a .30 (7.62 mm) caliber bullet.

.300 Winchester Magnum:

The .300 Winchester Magnum (7.62 × 67mmB) is a belted and bottleneck magnum rifle cartridge introduced by the Winchester Repeating Arms Company in 1963. The .300 Winchester Magnum is a magnum cartridge designed for standard rifle movement. It is based on the .375 H&H Magnum, which was blown out, shortened and reduced in size to accommodate a .30 (7.62 mm) caliber bullet.

7.62 × 54mmR:

The 7.62 × 54 mm rows is a rifle cartridge with rim developed by the Russian Empire and introduced as a service cartridge in 1891. Originally designed for the Mosin-Nagant bolt action rifle, it was used during the late Tsarist era and throughout the Soviet era to the present day. The cartridge is still one of the few standard rimmed cartridges still in military use and has one of the longest lifespans of any cartridge issued by the military.

.30-06 Springfield:

The .30-06 Springfield- Cartridge, 7.62 × 63 mm in metric notation and called ".30 Gov't '06" by Winchester, was introduced in the US Army in 1906 and later standardized. it remained in use until the late 1970s. The ".30" refers to the caliber of the bullet in inches. The "06" refers to the year the cartridge was introduced in 1906. It replaced the .30-03, 6 mm Lee Navy and .30-40 Krag cartridges. The .30-06 remained the main rifle and machine gun cartridge in the U.S. Army for nearly 50 years before being replaced by the 7.62 × 51mm NATO and the 5.56 × 45mm NATO, both in the current U.S. and NATO service remain. It remains a very popular sports round with ammunition from all major manufacturers.

7.62 × 25mm Tokarev:

The 7.62 × 25mm Tokarev Cartridge is a Russian bottleneck rimless pistol cartridge that is widely used in former Soviet states and China, among others. The cartridge has since been replaced in most capacities by the 9 × 18 mm Makarov in Russian service.

7.62 × 25mm Tokarev:

The 7.62 × 25mm Tokarev Cartridge is a Russian bottleneck rimless pistol cartridge that is widely used in former Soviet states and China, among others. The cartridge has since been replaced in most capacities by the 9 × 18 mm Makarov in Russian service.

7.62 × 25mm Tokarev:

The 7.62 × 25mm Tokarev Cartridge is a Russian bottleneck rimless pistol cartridge that is widely used in former Soviet states and China, among others. The cartridge has since been replaced in most capacities by the 9 × 18 mm Makarov in Russian service.

7.62 × 25mm Tokarev:

The 7.62 × 25mm Tokarev Cartridge is a Russian bottleneck rimless pistol cartridge that is widely used in former Soviet states and China, among others. The cartridge has since been replaced in most capacities by the 9 × 18 mm Makarov in Russian service.

7.62 × 25mm Tokarev:

The 7.62 × 25mm Tokarev Cartridge is a Russian bottleneck rimless pistol cartridge that is widely used in former Soviet states and China, among others. The cartridge has since been replaced in most capacities by the 9 × 18 mm Makarov in Russian service.

7.62 × 25mm Tokarev:

The 7.62 × 25mm Tokarev Cartridge is a Russian bottleneck rimless pistol cartridge that is widely used in former Soviet states and China, among others. The cartridge has since been replaced in most capacities by the 9 × 18 mm Makarov in Russian service.

.30 carabiner:

The .30 carabiner (7.62 × 33mm) is a rimless carbine cartridge used in the M1 carbine introduced in the 1940s. It is a lightweight rifle cartridge that can be fired from the 18-inch (458 mm) barrel of the M1 carbine.

300 AAC blackout:

The .300 AAC blackout , also known as 7.62 × 35 mm, is an intermediate cartridge that was developed in the USA by the Advanced Armament Corporation (AAC) for use in the M4 carbine. The goal is to achieve ballistics similar to the 7.62 × 39mm or even more similar to the 7.92 × 33mm short cartridge in an M4 while using standard M4 magazines of normal capacity become. 300 BLK ammunition cannot be used in a rifle with a chamber of 7.62 × 40 mm Wilson Tactical. It is mainly derived from the .300 Whisper concept, but differs in that it was submitted to SAAMI.

7.62 × 37mm Musang:

The 7.62 × 37 mm Musang is an assault rifle cartridge developed and manufactured in the Philippines in 2012 by the government arsenal for use by the military for special operations and hand-to-hand combat.

7.62 × 38mmR:

7.62 × 38 mm rows is an ammunition cartridge designed for use in the Russian Nagant M1895 revolver.

7.62 × 38mmR:

7.62 × 38 mm rows is an ammunition cartridge designed for use in the Russian Nagant M1895 revolver.

7.62 × 38mmR:

7.62 × 38 mm rows is an ammunition cartridge designed for use in the Russian Nagant M1895 revolver.

7.62 × 38mmR:

7.62 × 38 mm rows is an ammunition cartridge designed for use in the Russian Nagant M1895 revolver.

7.62 × 39 mm:

The 7.62 × 39 mm in size Cartridge is a rimless intermediate bottleneck cartridge of Soviet origin designed during World War II.Due to the worldwide spread of the Soviet SKS and AK-47 model rifles, as well as the RPD and RPK light machine guns, the cartridge is used by both military and civilians alike.

7.62 × 39 mm:

The 7.62 × 39 mm in size Cartridge is a rimless intermediate bottleneck cartridge of Soviet origin designed during World War II. Due to the worldwide spread of the Soviet SKS and AK-47 model rifles, as well as the RPD and RPK light machine guns, the cartridge is used by both military and civilians alike.

7.62 × 39 mm:

The 7.62 × 39 mm in size Cartridge is a rimless intermediate bottleneck cartridge of Soviet origin designed during World War II. Due to the worldwide spread of the Soviet SKS and AK-47 model rifles, as well as the RPD and RPK light machine guns, the cartridge is used by both military and civilians alike.

7.62 × 39 mm:

The 7.62 × 39 mm in size Cartridge is a rimless intermediate bottleneck cartridge of Soviet origin designed during World War II. Due to the worldwide spread of the Soviet SKS and AK-47 model rifles, as well as the RPD and RPK light machine guns, the cartridge is used by both military and civilians alike.

7.62 × 39 mm:

The 7.62 × 39 mm in size Cartridge is a rimless intermediate bottleneck cartridge of Soviet origin designed during World War II. Due to the worldwide spread of the Soviet SKS and AK-47 model rifles, as well as the RPD and RPK light machine guns, the cartridge is used by both military and civilians alike.

7.62 × 40mm Wilson Tactical:

The Wilson Tactical 7.62x40mm is a centerfire rifle cartridge introduced by Wilson Combat in 2011. The aim was to produce an accurate, low recoil hunting cartridge with a caliber of 0.30 that could be used in an AR-15 rifle using as many standard components as possible.

7.62 × 40mm Wilson Tactical:

The Wilson Tactical 7.62x40mm is a centerfire rifle cartridge introduced by Wilson Combat in 2011. The aim was to produce an accurate, low recoil hunting cartridge with a caliber of 0.30 that could be used in an AR-15 rifle using as many standard components as possible.

PSS silent pistol:

The PSS Silent Pistol or MSS "Vul" ("Wool") is the last completed weapon system resulting from the Soviet development of Silent Pistols, which are operated with a sealed cartridge system. Two earlier designs were considered unacceptable for use due to their two-shot limitation. Earlier systems included the MSP and SP-4M double barrel guns. The PSS was developed around 1980 for assassinations and reconnaissance and was first issued to KGB Spetsnaz in 1983. It is made in the special weapons foundry of TsNIITochMash. PSS pistols are still used by elite special forces of many nations, as well as by some FSB and MVD units.

7.62 × 45 mm:

The 7.62 × 45 mm is a rimless intermediate rifle cartridge with a bottleneck developed in Czechoslovakia. It is fired from the Czech Vz. 52 rifle, Vz. 52 light machine guns and ZB-53 machine gun. The round was later discontinued when the Czech switched to the Warsaw Pact's standard round, which was 7.62 × 39mm. The muzzle velocity and energy are slightly higher than that of the 7.62 × 39mm cartridge.

7.62 × 45 mm:

The 7.62 × 45 mm is a rimless intermediate rifle cartridge with a bottleneck developed in Czechoslovakia. It is fired from the Czech Vz. 52 rifle, Vz. 52 light machine guns and ZB-53 machine gun. The round was later discontinued when the Czech switched to the Warsaw Pact's standard round, which was 7.62 × 39mm. The muzzle velocity and energy are slightly higher than that of the 7.62 × 39mm cartridge.

7.62 × 45 mm:

The 7.62 × 45 mm is a rimless intermediate rifle cartridge with a bottleneck developed in Czechoslovakia. It is fired from the Czech Vz. 52 rifle, Vz. 52 light machine guns and ZB-53 machine gun. The round was later discontinued when the Czech switched to the Warsaw Pact's standard round, which was 7.62 × 39mm. The muzzle velocity and energy are slightly higher than that of the 7.62 × 39mm cartridge.

7.62 × 51 mm CETME:

The 7.62 × 51 mm CETME- Cartridge is a variant of the 7.62 × 51 mm NATO rifle cartridge with a lead bullet with a plastic core and a reduced propellant charge. The 7.62 × 51 mm CETME is otherwise identical to the NATO standard. It was produced as a joint venture between the Spanish design and development organization CETME and the German weapons manufacturer Heckler & Koch.

7.62 × 51 mm NATO:

The 7.62 × 51 mm NATO is a rimless bottleneck rifle cartridge developed as the standard for small arms among NATO countries in the 1950s. It is sometimes confused with the Russian cartridge of the same name, 7.62 × 54 mmR, a slightly longer cartridge with a rim.

7.62 × 51 mm NATO:

The 7.62 × 51 mm NATO is a rimless bottleneck rifle cartridge developed as the standard for small arms among NATO countries in the 1950s. It is sometimes confused with the Russian cartridge of the same name, 7.62 × 54 mmR, a slightly longer cartridge with a rim.

7.62 × 51 mm NATO:

The 7.62 × 51 mm NATO is a rimless bottleneck rifle cartridge developed as the standard for small arms among NATO countries in the 1950s. It is sometimes confused with the Russian cartridge of the same name, 7.62 × 54 mmR, a slightly longer cartridge with a rim.

7.62 × 51 mm NATO:

The 7.62 × 51 mm NATO is a rimless bottleneck rifle cartridge developed as the standard for small arms among NATO countries in the 1950s. It is sometimes confused with the Russian cartridge of the same name, 7.62 × 54 mmR, a slightly longer cartridge with a rim.

7.62 × 51 mm CETME:

The 7.62 × 51 mm CETME- Cartridge is a variant of the 7.62 × 51 mm NATO rifle cartridge with a lead bullet with a plastic core and a reduced propellant charge. The 7.62 × 51 mm CETME is otherwise identical to the NATO standard. It was produced as a joint venture between the Spanish design and development organization CETME and the German weapons manufacturer Heckler & Koch.

7.62 × 51 mm NATO:

The 7.62 × 51 mm NATO is a rimless bottleneck rifle cartridge developed as the standard for small arms among NATO countries in the 1950s. It is sometimes confused with the Russian cartridge of the same name, 7.62 × 54 mmR, a slightly longer cartridge with a rim.

7.62 × 53mmR:

The 7.62 × 53 mm row - Rifle cartridge is a Finnish design based on the Russian 7.62 × 54 mm R -Cartridge from 1891 based.

7.62 × 53mmR:

The 7.62 × 53 mm row - Rifle cartridge is a Finnish design based on the Russian 7.62 × 54 mm R -Cartridge from 1891 based.

7.62 × 54mmR:

The 7.62 × 54 mm rows is a rifle cartridge with rim developed by the Russian Empire and introduced as a service cartridge in 1891. Originally designed for the Mosin-Nagant bolt action rifle, it was used during the late Tsarist era and throughout the Soviet era to the present day. The cartridge is still one of the few standard rimmed cartridges still in military use and has one of the longest lifespans of any cartridge issued by the military.

7.62 × 54mmR:

The 7.62 × 54 mm rows is a rifle cartridge with rim developed by the Russian Empire and introduced as a service cartridge in 1891. Originally designed for the Mosin-Nagant bolt action rifle, it was used during the late Tsarist era and throughout the Soviet era to the present day. The cartridge is still one of the few standard rimmed cartridges still in military use and has one of the longest lifespans of any cartridge issued by the military.

7.62 × 54mmR:

The 7.62 × 54 mm rows is a rifle cartridge with rim developed by the Russian Empire and introduced as a service cartridge in 1891. Originally designed for the Mosin-Nagant bolt action rifle, it was used during the late Tsarist era and throughout the Soviet era to the present day. The cartridge is still one of the few standard rimmed cartridges still in military use and has one of the longest lifespans of any cartridge issued by the military.

7.62 × 54mmR:

The 7.62 × 54 mm rows is a rifle cartridge with rim developed by the Russian Empire and introduced as a service cartridge in 1891. Originally designed for the Mosin-Nagant bolt action rifle, it was used during the late Tsarist era and throughout the Soviet era to the present day. The cartridge is still one of the few standard rimmed cartridges still in military use and has one of the longest lifespans of any cartridge issued by the military.

7.62 × 54mmR:

The 7.62 × 54 mm rows is a rifle cartridge with rim developed by the Russian Empire and introduced as a service cartridge in 1891. Originally designed for the Mosin-Nagant bolt action rifle, it was used during the late Tsarist era and throughout the Soviet era to the present day. The cartridge is still one of the few standard rimmed cartridges still in military use and has one of the longest lifespans of any cartridge issued by the military.

7.62 × 54mmR:

The 7.62 × 54 mm rows is a rifle cartridge with rim developed by the Russian Empire and introduced as a service cartridge in 1891. Originally designed for the Mosin-Nagant bolt action rifle, it was used during the late Tsarist era and throughout the Soviet era to the present day. The cartridge is still one of the few standard rimmed cartridges still in military use and has one of the longest lifespans of any cartridge issued by the military.

7.5 × 54 mm French:

The 7.5 x 54 mm French or 7.5 French is a rimless rifle cartridge with a bottleneck. It was developed by France as an update for the 7.5 × 57 mm MAS Mod. Cartridge from 1924. It replaced the obsolete 8 × 50mmR Lebel round used in World War I.

7.62 × 54mmR:

The 7.62 × 54 mm rows is a rifle cartridge with rim developed by the Russian Empire and introduced as a service cartridge in 1891. Originally designed for the Mosin-Nagant bolt action rifle, it was used during the late Tsarist era and throughout the Soviet era to the present day. The cartridge is still one of the few standard rimmed cartridges still in military use and has one of the longest lifespans of any cartridge issued by the military.

7.62mm UKM:

The 7.62 mm UKM [7.62 × 57mm] is a special rimless bottleneck centerfire cartridge designed for long-range rifles. The commercially successful .338 Lapua Magnum cartridge acted as the parent case for the 7.62mm UKM, which is essentially a shortened version of the .338 Lapua Magnum. The .338 cartridge case was used for this, as it can work with high chamber pressures, which in combination with smaller and therefore lighter projectiles leads to high muzzle velocities.

30-40 cantilever:

The .30-40 cantilever was a cartridge developed in the early 1890s to provide the U.S. armed forces with a smoke-free powder cartridge suitable for use with modern small-bore bolt-action rifles selected in the small-arm trials of 1892. Since the cartridge that was replaced was the Government .45-70, the cartridge was considered a .45-70 at the time small . The design chosen was ultimately the Krag-Jørgensen, which was officially adopted as the M1892 Springfield. It was also used in M1893 and later Gatling guns.

30-40 cantilever:

The .30-40 cantilever was a cartridge developed in the early 1890s to provide the U.S. armed forces with a smoke-free powder cartridge suitable for use with modern small-bore bolt-action rifles selected in the small-arm trials of 1892. Since the cartridge that was replaced was the Government .45-70, the cartridge was considered a .45-70 at the time small . The design chosen was ultimately the Krag-Jørgensen, which was officially adopted as the M1892 Springfield. It was also used in M1893 and later Gatling guns.

.30-06 Springfield:

The .30-06 Springfield- Cartridge, 7.62 × 63 mm in metric notation and called ".30 Gov't '06" by Winchester, was introduced in the US Army in 1906 and later standardized. it remained in use until the late 1970s. The ".30" refers to the caliber of the bullet in inches. The "06" refers to the year the cartridge was introduced in 1906. It replaced the .30-03, 6 mm Lee Navy and .30-40 Krag cartridges. The .30-06 remained the main rifle and machine gun cartridge in the U.S. Army for nearly 50 years before being replaced by the 7.62 × 51mm NATO and the 5.56 × 45mm NATO, both in the current U.S. and NATO service remain. It remains a very popular sports round with ammunition from all major manufacturers.

.30-03:

The .30-03 Springfield (7.62 × 65mm) was a short-lived cartridge developed by the US in 1903 to replace the .30-40 Krag in the new Springfield 1903 rifle. The .30-03 was also known as the .30-45 because it used a powder charge of 45 grains; The name was changed to .30-03 to indicate the year of adoption. A 220-grit round nose ball was used. It was replaced by the .30-06 after only three years of operation and fired a Spitzer bullet that achieved better ballistic performance.

.300 Winchester Magnum:

The .300 Winchester Magnum (7.62 × 67mmB) is a belted and bottleneck magnum rifle cartridge introduced by the Winchester Repeating Arms Company in 1963. The .300 Winchester Magnum is a magnum cartridge designed for standard rifle movement. It is based on the .375 H&H Magnum, which was blown out, shortened and reduced in size to accommodate a .30 (7.62 mm) caliber bullet.

.300 Winchester Magnum:

The .300 Winchester Magnum (7.62 × 67mmB) is a belted and bottleneck magnum rifle cartridge introduced by the Winchester Repeating Arms Company in 1963. The .300 Winchester Magnum is a magnum cartridge designed for standard rifle movement. It is based on the .375 H&H Magnum, which was blown out, shortened and reduced in size to accommodate a .30 (7.62 mm) caliber bullet.

7.63 × 25 mm Mauser:

The 7.63 × 25 mm Mauser Cartridge was the original cartridge for the Mauser C96 service pistol. This cartridge headspaces on the shoulder of the case. It later served as the basis for the 7.62mm Tokarev cartridge commonly used in weapons of the Soviet and Eastern Bloc.

7.63 × 25 mm Mauser:

The 7.63 × 25 mm Mauser Cartridge was the original cartridge for the Mauser C96 service pistol. This cartridge headspaces on the shoulder of the case. It later served as the basis for the 7.62mm Tokarev cartridge commonly used in weapons of the Soviet and Eastern Bloc.

7.63 × 25 mm Mauser:

The 7.63 × 25 mm Mauser Cartridge was the original cartridge for the Mauser C96 service pistol. This cartridge headspaces on the shoulder of the case. It later served as the basis for the 7.62mm Tokarev cartridge commonly used in weapons of the Soviet and Eastern Bloc.

Caliber 7 mm:

This article lists firearm cartridges that have a bullet in the 7.00 to 7.99 millimeter caliber range.

  • The length refers to the length of the cartridge housing.
  • OAL refers to the total length of the cartridge.
7.65 × 21 mm Mannlicher:

The 7.63 mm Mannlicher or 7.65 mm Mannlicher is a Centerfire pistol cartridge that was developed for the Steyr Mannlicher M1901 pistol. This military pistol was rejected by the Austrian War Ministry, but was often carried as a private weapon by officers. England began making ammunition when the Mannlicher pistol became popular in South America.Germany began making ammunition after World War I, but identified the ammunition as 7.65 Mannlicher to differentiate it from the 7.63 × 25 mm Mauser cartridge. This cartridge heads spaces on the muzzle of the case.

7.63 × 25 mm Mauser:

The 7.63 × 25 mm Mauser Cartridge was the original cartridge for the Mauser C96 service pistol. This cartridge headspaces on the shoulder of the case. It later served as the basis for the 7.62mm Tokarev cartridge commonly used in weapons of the Soviet and Eastern Bloc.

7.63 × 25 mm Mauser:

The 7.63 × 25 mm Mauser Cartridge was the original cartridge for the Mauser C96 service pistol. This cartridge headspaces on the shoulder of the case. It later served as the basis for the 7.62mm Tokarev cartridge commonly used in weapons of the Soviet and Eastern Bloc.

7.63 × 25 mm Mauser:

The 7.63 × 25 mm Mauser Cartridge was the original cartridge for the Mauser C96 service pistol. This cartridge headspaces on the shoulder of the case. It later served as the basis for the 7.62mm Tokarev cartridge commonly used in weapons of the Soviet and Eastern Bloc.

7.63 × 25 mm Mauser:

The 7.63 × 25 mm Mauser Cartridge was the original cartridge for the Mauser C96 service pistol. This cartridge headspaces on the shoulder of the case. It later served as the basis for the 7.62mm Tokarev cartridge commonly used in weapons of the Soviet and Eastern Bloc.

7.63 × 25 mm Mauser:

The 7.63 × 25 mm Mauser Cartridge was the original cartridge for the Mauser C96 service pistol. This cartridge headspaces on the shoulder of the case. It later served as the basis for the 7.62mm Tokarev cartridge commonly used in weapons of the Soviet and Eastern Bloc.

7.63 × 25 mm Mauser:

The 7.63 × 25 mm Mauser Cartridge was the original cartridge for the Mauser C96 service pistol. This cartridge headspaces on the shoulder of the case. It later served as the basis for the 7.62mm Tokarev cartridge commonly used in weapons of the Soviet and Eastern Bloc.

7.65 × 20 mm length:

The 7.65 × 20 mm long Cartridge was a straight rimless cartridge that was used in the French Modèle 1935 pistol as well as the MAS-38 submachine gun.

7.65 × 53 mm Mauser:

The 7.65 × 53 mm Mauser is a first generation, smoke-free, rimless powder rifle cartridge with a powder rim, which was developed by Paul Mauser of the Mauser company for use in the Mauser model 1889 rifle. It is also called 7.65 × 53mm Argentina,7.65 × 53mm Argentine rimless,7.65 Argentina,7.65 × 53mm Belgian Mauser or 7.65 Belgian and 7.65 × 53mm Mauser known.

.32 ACP:

.32 ACP is a Centerfire pistol cartridge. It is a half-rimmed, straight-walled cartridge developed by firearms designer John Browning and originally used for the FN M1900 semi-automatic pistol. It was introduced by Fabrique Nationale in 1899 and is also called 7,65 × 17mmSR Browning or 7.65mm Browning Short known .

7.65 × 20 mm length:

The 7.65 × 20 mm long Cartridge was a straight rimless cartridge that was used in the French Modèle 1935 pistol as well as the MAS-38 submachine gun.

7.65 mm Roth-Sauer:

The 7.65mm Roth Sauer Cartridge is a centerfire cartridge that is similar to an abbreviated .32 ACP. Two self-loading pocket pistols were developed for this cartridge. One was made by Roth-Sauer from Germany and the other by Frommer from Hungary.

7.65 × 21 mm Parabellum:

The 7.65 × 21 mm parabellum is a pistol cartridge that was introduced in 1898 by the German arms manufacturer Deutsche Waffen- und Munitionsfabriken (DWM) for the new Parabellum pistol. The main developers of the pistol cartridge were the firearm designers Georg Luger and Hugo Borchardt, who developed the round from the earlier 7.65 × 25 mm Borchardt while working at DWM.

7.65 × 20 mm length:

The 7.65 × 20 mm long Cartridge was a straight rimless cartridge that was used in the French Modèle 1935 pistol as well as the MAS-38 submachine gun.

.32 ACP:

.32 ACP is a Centerfire pistol cartridge. It is a half-rimmed, straight-walled cartridge developed by firearms designer John Browning and originally used for the FN M1900 semi-automatic pistol. It was introduced by Fabrique Nationale in 1899 and is also called 7,65 × 17mmSR Browning or 7.65mm Browning Short known .

7.65 × 25 mm Borchardt:

The 7.65 × 25 mm Borchardt Cartridge was designed by Georg Johann Luger for use in the Borchardt C-93 pistol by Hugo Borchardt. It was the first successful rimless pistol cartridge.

.32 ACP:

.32 ACP is a Centerfire pistol cartridge. It is a half-rimmed, straight-walled cartridge developed by firearms designer John Browning and originally used for the FN M1900 semi-automatic pistol. It was introduced by Fabrique Nationale in 1899 and is also called 7,65 × 17mmSR Browning or 7.65mm Browning Short known .

7.65 × 20 mm length:

The 7.65 × 20 mm long Cartridge was a straight rimless cartridge that was used in the French Modèle 1935 pistol as well as the MAS-38 submachine gun.

7.65 × 21 mm Parabellum:

The 7.65 × 21 mm parabellum is a pistol cartridge that was introduced in 1898 by the German arms manufacturer Deutsche Waffen- und Munitionsfabriken (DWM) for the new Parabellum pistol. The main developers of the pistol cartridge were the firearm designers Georg Luger and Hugo Borchardt, who developed the round from the earlier 7.65 × 25 mm Borchardt while working at DWM.

7.65 × 21 mm Parabellum:

The 7.65 × 21 mm parabellum is a pistol cartridge that was introduced in 1898 by the German arms manufacturer Deutsche Waffen- und Munitionsfabriken (DWM) for the new Parabellum pistol. The main developers of the pistol cartridge were the firearm designers Georg Luger and Hugo Borchardt, who developed the round from the earlier 7.65 × 25 mm Borchardt while working at DWM.

7.65 × 21 mm Mannlicher:

The 7.63 mm Mannlicher or 7.65 mm Mannlicher is a Centerfire pistol cartridge that was developed for the Steyr Mannlicher M1901 pistol. This military pistol was rejected by the Austrian War Ministry, but was often carried as a private weapon by officers. England began making ammunition when the Mannlicher pistol became popular in South America. Germany began making ammunition after World War I, but identified the ammunition as 7.65 Mannlicher to differentiate it from the 7.63 × 25 mm Mauser cartridge. This cartridge heads spaces on the muzzle of the case.

7.65 × 21 mm Parabellum:

The 7.65 × 21 mm parabellum is a pistol cartridge that was introduced in 1898 by the German arms manufacturer Deutsche Waffen- und Munitionsfabriken (DWM) for the new Parabellum pistol. The main developers of the pistol cartridge were the firearm designers Georg Luger and Hugo Borchardt, who developed the round from the earlier 7.65 × 25 mm Borchardt while working at DWM.

7.65 mm Roth-Sauer:

The 7.65mm Roth Sauer Cartridge is a centerfire cartridge that is similar to an abbreviated .32 ACP. Two self-loading pocket pistols were developed for this cartridge. One was made by Roth-Sauer from Germany and the other by Frommer from Hungary.

.32 ACP:

.32 ACP is a Centerfire pistol cartridge. It is a half-rimmed, straight-walled cartridge developed by firearms designer John Browning and originally used for the FN M1900 semi-automatic pistol. It was introduced by Fabrique Nationale in 1899 and is also called 7,65 × 17mmSR Browning or 7.65mm Browning Short known .

7.65 × 21 mm Parabellum:

The 7.65 × 21 mm parabellum is a pistol cartridge that was introduced in 1898 by the German arms manufacturer Deutsche Waffen- und Munitionsfabriken (DWM) for the new Parabellum pistol. The main developers of the pistol cartridge were the firearm designers Georg Luger and Hugo Borchardt, who developed the round from the earlier 7.65 × 25 mm Borchardt while working at DWM.

7.65 × 21 mm Parabellum:

The 7.65 × 21 mm parabellum is a pistol cartridge that was introduced in 1898 by the German arms manufacturer Deutsche Waffen- und Munitionsfabriken (DWM) for the new Parabellum pistol. The main developers of the pistol cartridge were the firearm designers Georg Luger and Hugo Borchardt, who developed the round from the earlier 7.65 × 25 mm Borchardt while working at DWM.

7.65 × 25 mm Borchardt:

The 7.65 × 25 mm Borchardt Cartridge was designed by Georg Johann Luger for use in the Borchardt C-93 pistol by Hugo Borchardt. It was the first successful rimless pistol cartridge.

7.65 × 53 mm Mauser:

The 7.65 × 53 mm Mauser is a first generation, smoke-free, rimless powder rifle cartridge with a powder rim, which was developed by Paul Mauser of the Mauser company for use in the Mauser model 1889 rifle. It is also called 7.65 × 53mm Argentina,7.65 × 53mm Argentine rimless,7.65 Argentina,7.65 × 53mm Belgian Mauser or 7.65 Belgian and 7.65 × 53mm Mauser known.

7.65 × 53 mm Mauser:

The 7.65 × 53 mm Mauser is a first generation, smoke-free, rimless powder rifle cartridge with a powder rim, which was developed by Paul Mauser of the Mauser company for use in the Mauser model 1889 rifle. It is also called 7.65 × 53mm Argentina,7.65 × 53mm Argentine rimless,7.65 Argentina,7.65 × 53mm Belgian Mauser or 7.65 Belgian and 7.65 × 53mm Mauser known.

7.65 × 53 mm Mauser:

The 7.65 × 53 mm Mauser is a first generation, smoke-free, rimless powder rifle cartridge with a powder rim, which was developed by Paul Mauser of the Mauser company for use in the Mauser model 1889 rifle. It is also called 7.65 × 53mm Argentina,7.65 × 53mm Argentine rimless,7.65 Argentina,7.65 × 53mm Belgian Mauser or 7.65 Belgian and 7.65 × 53mm Mauser known.

7.65 × 53 mm Mauser:

The 7.65 × 53 mm Mauser is a first generation, smokeless, rimless powder rifle cartridge with a powder rim, which was developed by Paul Mauser of the Mauser company for use in the Mauser model 1889 rifle. It is also called 7.65 × 53mm Argentina,7.65 × 53mm Argentine rimless,7.65 Argentina,7.65 × 53mm Belgian Mauser or 7.65 Belgian and 7.65 × 53mm Mauser known.

7.65 × 53 mm Mauser:

The 7.65 × 53 mm Mauser is a first generation, smokeless, rimless powder rifle cartridge with a powder rim, which was developed by Paul Mauser of the Mauser company for use in the Mauser model 1889 rifle. It is also called 7.65 × 53mm Argentina,7.65 × 53mm Argentine rimless,7.65 Argentina,7.65 × 53mm Belgian Mauser or 7.65 Belgian and 7.65 × 53mm Mauser known.

7.65 × 53 mm Mauser:

The 7.65 × 53 mm Mauser is a first generation, smoke-free, rimless powder rifle cartridge with a powder rim, which was developed by Paul Mauser of the Mauser company for use in the Mauser model 1889 rifle. It is also called 7.65 × 53mm Argentina,7.65 × 53mm Argentine rimless,7.65 Argentina,7.65 × 53mm Belgian Mauser or 7.65 Belgian and 7.65 × 53mm Mauser known.

7.65 × 53 mm Mauser:

The 7.65 × 53 mm Mauser is a first generation, smokeless, rimless powder rifle cartridge with a powder rim, which was developed by Paul Mauser of the Mauser company for use in the Mauser model 1889 rifle. It is also called 7.65 × 53mm Argentina,7.65 × 53mm Argentine rimless,7.65 Argentina,7.65 × 53mm Belgian Mauser or 7.65 Belgian and 7.65 × 53mm Mauser known.

7.65 × 21 mm Mannlicher:

The 7.63 mm Mannlicher or 7.65 mm Mannlicher is a Centerfire pistol cartridge that was developed for the Steyr Mannlicher M1901 pistol. This military pistol was rejected by the Austrian War Ministry, but was often carried as a private weapon by officers. England began making ammunition when the Mannlicher pistol became popular in South America. Germany began making ammunition after World War I, but identified the ammunition as 7.65 Mannlicher to differentiate it from the 7.63 × 25 mm Mauser cartridge. This cartridge heads spaces on the muzzle of the case.

7.65 × 53 mm Mauser:

The 7.65 × 53 mm Mauser is a first generation, smoke-free, rimless powder rifle cartridge with a powder rim, which was developed by Paul Mauser of the Mauser company for use in the Mauser model 1889 rifle. It is also called 7.65 × 53mm Argentina,7.65 × 53mm Argentine rimless,7.65 Argentina,7.65 × 53mm Belgian Mauser or 7.65 Belgian and 7.65 × 53mm Mauser known.

7.65mm:

7.65 mm can refer to the following firearm cartridges:

  • .32 ACP
  • 7.65 mm Roth-Sauer
  • 7.65 × 20 mm long
  • 7.65 × 21 mm parabellum
  • 7.65 × 21 mm Mannlicher
  • 7.65 × 25 mm Borchardt
  • 7.65 × 53 mm Argentina
7.65mm:

7.65 mm can refer to the following firearm cartridges:

  • .32 ACP
  • 7.65 mm Roth-Sauer
  • 7.65 × 20 mm long
  • 7.65 × 21 mm parabellum
  • 7.65 × 21 mm Mannlicher
  • 7.65 × 25 mm Borchardt
  • 7.65 × 53 mm Argentina
7.65 × 53 mm Mauser:

The 7.65 × 53 mm Mauser is a first generation, smoke-free, rimless powder rifle cartridge with a powder rim, which was developed by Paul Mauser of the Mauser company for use in the Mauser model 1889 rifle. It is also called 7.65 × 53mm Argentina,7.65 × 53mm Argentine rimless,7.65 Argentina,7.65 × 53mm Belgian Mauser or 7.65 Belgian and 7.65 × 53mm Mauser known.

7.65 × 53 mm Mauser:

The 7.65 × 53 mm Mauser is a first generation, smoke-free, rimless powder rifle cartridge with a powder rim, which was developed by Paul Mauser of the Mauser company for use in the Mauser model 1889 rifle. It is also called 7.65 × 53mm Argentina,7.65 × 53mm Argentine rimless,7.65 Argentina,7.65 × 53mm Belgian Mauser or 7.65 Belgian and 7.65 × 53mm Mauser known.

.32 ACP:

.32 ACP is a Centerfire pistol cartridge. It is a half-rimmed, straight-walled cartridge developed by firearms designer John Browning and originally used for the FN M1900 semi-automatic pistol. It was introduced by Fabrique Nationale in 1899 and is also called 7,65 × 17mmSR Browning or 7.65mm Browning Short known .

7.65 × 20 mm length:

The 7.65 × 20 mm long Cartridge was a straight, rimless cartridge that was used in the French Modèle 1935 pistol as well as the MAS-38 submachine gun.

7.65 × 20 mm length:

The 7.65 × 20 mm long Cartridge was a straight rimless cartridge that was used in the French Modèle 1935 pistol as well as the MAS-38 submachine gun.